Sunday, September 16, 2018

You deal with your own darkness with an ignited lamp - Reason 58


A leader has bad moments as does anybody and maybe, because of being a leader, those moments look even worse.

But leaders don’t let themselves fall into a trap of problems, turmoil and insecurity, because even in the dark, their lamp remains lit.

Sometimes the lamp is just a better attitude.  Good thoughts, positive and constructive emotions and a powerful book help the leader to understand whatever she or he is going through. With understanding, they can find solutions, or at least momentary relief.

Other times, the lamp may be a change in the consciousness.  Meditation and yoga, reflection and contemplation, learning from someone who has a completely different approach to life, or travelling through an unusual place can make a deep change in the person and help to find long-term solutions.

The good thing about a leader is that there is always a lamp, which, by the way, will help others with its light too.


(Excerpt from the book 82 Reasons to be a Leader)

Sunday, September 9, 2018

A leader’s clock is always ticking, but with no pressure - Reason 57


Time harasses people, or it looks that way when it is a Monday morning or Friday evening and people rush and rush, from everywhere to anywhere.  Add to that 24 hours news and entertainment, cheap communication tools and an endless exploration of the world, and we have a population that is busier than its ancestors.

This sense of ‘busyness’ has become the source of illness, as shown in an article[1] by blogger Scott Dannemiller, giving a general sense of powerlessness to people, as they are not able to fulfil a basic to-do list or to finish reading all the books on the shelf; after all, people are ‘too busy’ to do that.

For a leader, time is just a tool and so does not take the form of a burden.  This healthy relationship with omnipresent time gives her or him a more relaxed view of the world.  Besides, leaders have a competitive edge over other type of people, because they live without tension and so they can pay better attention to their duty, work or project.


(Excerpt from the book 82 Reasons to be a Leader)





[1] Based on research as well Dannemiller’s personal experience, Busy is a Sickness describes with humour how to be busy is becoming an epidemic.   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-dannemiller/busy-is-a-sickness_b_6761264.html

Sunday, September 2, 2018

There is clarity during uncertain times - Reason 56


Uncertainty generates doubts and questioning.  As a coping mechanism, people often complain and regret, which don’t contribute much to change anything that is happening.

But there are people who are reflecting on it: an interesting article welcomes people to the age of uncertainty[1] and it tries to explain the reasons for what the author calls the current mood of uncertainty and it explores the theories behind them.

By drawing on some current situations as a base and how those same situations are now passed, it observes how they are still a source of uncertainty.  A conclusion is that uncertainty does not end for a normal person, not even after reflection… it just develops and turns into something else.

For a leader, there is clarity no matter how uncertain the world may be, or the microcosms in which the leader lives.  That clarity comes from his or her clarity in relation to their capacity of leadership, particularly leading the self and a leader turns uncertainty into an adventure and an opportunity to change things around.


(Excerpt from the book 82 Reasons to be a Leader)
 




[1] Welcome to the new age of uncertainty was written by Stuart Jeffries in The Guardian, on July 26th 2016.   https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/26/new-age-of-uncertainty-brexit-trump-future-world-flux